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    I have used a lot of health apps and I think they are useful, for me, for forming new habits. I used LoseIt! for years and it really helped me not only to lose weight but to get a much better sense of the nutritional contents of foods. I eat much better now and I almost never use the app.

     

    I also wear a fitbit and though the app I can see my sleep patterns. I don’t think seeing my sleep patterns has been particularly helpful but it has made me more mindful of the need to go to bed early enough to get in a full eight hours (that’s the goal, though seldom attained).

     

    So to answer your question, yes, I have used apps to help me learn something but after that I don’t really need it anymore. #devicesforbodyknowledge


    AppleStrudel
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    Some of the devices that have helped me are the following:  a sleep diary; a sleep hypnosis app that helps me fall asleep/fall back asleep; a depression checker/diary;  a food diary to help identify sensitivities/triggers; a weight tracker; and I use the Peak app pretty much daily to help improve my brain function/focus.  After learning proper sleep hygiene and what to do if I wake up in the middle of the night (which happens quite frequently – don’t lay in bed and stress about going back to sleep), I stopped keeping that diary.  I started using a sleep hypnosis app that is very effective at getting me to fall asleep and/or fall back asleep when I wake up in the middle of the night.  My depression is linked directly to the constant pain I am in, so there was no benefit I could find in keeping a diary or using a checker/tracker for it; when my pain goes up, I feel more down, when my pain goes down, I’m as happy as can be.  I learned, for the most part, what foods cause inflammation and/or increase my pain levels so I stopped keeping the food diary – I just try to avoid those foods that make things worse.  My weight has remained steady for the last few years following an initial rapid gain (50+ lbs) when I started taking the meds I’m currently on (Lyrica, Wellbutrin XL, and Zoloft) – I would love to come off the meds but, I’ve tried that and the results weren’t pretty.  Being larger doesn’t help with the depression but I just have to remind myself that being larger is better than being completely crippled by the pain.  The Peak app has helped tremendously with my cognitive function so I will continue using that app.  All of my diary/trackers were written out versus electronic due to the fact writing things down causes me to think things through a bit differently then typing them on a screen…  The delete/backspace button makes it too easy to change what it is you’re typing and writing it out works different areas of the brain.  Overall, I find that I will use a diary/tracker until I learn what it is I need to know from it and then I generally stop using the diary/tracker and move on to some other tool that helps me improve my situation.  #devicesforbodyknowledge  #learning  #writingwithpenandpaper

     


    MyndiR
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    As a researcher in health informatics myself, I’ve done a lot of experimentation with different mobile apps to track things like diet and fitness. But ultimately my personal goal has been to get in touch with my body enough so that I don’t have to use them anymore. I’ve never totally attained this goal but it’s something I keep returning to. I’m curious about what others have done. Have you ever tried out a system (not necessarily a mobile app, maybe even something mental or paper-based) to try to learn your own habits or your own physical cues? How did it turn out?

    #devices #digitaloranalog #learning


    applefi

    Do you think that mobile devices help you understand your body better? Is there a way that you try to strike a balance between using devices and listening to your own body, or do you see these as not being opposed to one another? Is the utility of tracking time­ limited? For example, tracking your food intake might lead to discovery of your food sensitivities. After that, do you still need it?

    #devicesforbodyknowledge


    marygrace
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